James Larkin, A True Hero by His Own Right

It is true to state that history will always have a place for its great sons and daughters as evidenced by James Larkin a famous Irish historical figure whose name has stood the test of time.

From a very young age, Jim exuded potential to attain great things in his life through hard work and his courageous ability to voice injustices perpetrated against laborers. It was through this ability to fight for laborer’s rights that saw him rise to become great and a hero to many till this day.

His story is one that had a humble beginning as he was born and brought up in the slums of Liverpool, England. It was on the 21st January of 1876 that James Larkin was born.

Due to poverty in the slums, James was not able to attend and complete his formal education. Instead, he had dropped out and engaged in small jobs at the docks to help in his family’s income. Read more: Jim Larkin | Biography and Jim Larkin | Wikipedia

Due to his hard work and dedication, James slowly rose the ranks where he worked at the docks to become a foreman. It was while working at there that James became a socialist who advocated for the rights of his co-workers.

His drive as a socialist got driven by the injustices and the unfair treatment of works and as a result, joined NUDL or National Union of Dock Labourers. It was in the year 1905, and as a result, he went on to become an organizer at the trade union working full time.

The methods that James Larkin employed in fighting for works rights were somewhat aggressive and considered militant. The NUDL got alarmed and decided to transfer him to Dublin. His transfer occurred in the year 1907.

It was in the same year that James Larkin would go on to establish Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union. This union brought together all skilled and unskilled Irish industrial laborers. Larkin again went on to institute the Irish Labour Party.

In all his struggles for the rights of workers, James Larkin was able to lead many strikes, and one of the most significant strikes is one held in 1913 named the Dublin Lockout that saw 100,000 works participate for eight months.

Learn more about Jim Larkin:

http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsfilmtv/books/the-definitive-biography-of-big-jim-larkin-372254.html
http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/jim-larkin-released-from-prison

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